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February 3, 2017 | No Comments

Overview Tanzania is one of the fastest growing countries on the African continent, and is rich in natural resources. At least 31.6 percent of the country’s 53.47 million people live in urban areas, with a population growth rate of almost three percent and an urbanisation rate of five and a half percent per annum. The country has experienced impressive GDP growth rates over the past decade averaging almost seven percent per year.  The GDP grew by 7.1 percent in year 2015, higher than the growth of seven percent in 2014 the rate is projected to remain at approximately seven percent through year 2020….

January 30, 2017 by David Gardner | No Comments

Over the course of the year, CAHF will be publishing a series of blogs on Housing and the Economy and Housing Costs in Africa. Two of the longest-standing unanswered questions in housing are: “What does housing contribute to the economies of African countries?” and “How much does it cost to build an affordable house in Africa?” CAHF has recently completed two studies that give us clearer answers to these two questions, and many others as well. Both studies are ground-breaking in their approaches, venturing into territories where real information is scarce, and data to build that information severely lacking. While we don’t claim to have definitively answered these…

The last year has seen the introduction of some long-outstanding fiscal reforms in Angola’s housing economy. The new Minister of Housing and Urban Development Ms Branca do Espírito Santo has brought some new insights from her years in senior management in the nominally-private-sector real-estate company IMOGESTIN and even earlier as director of a civil-society organization. She assumed her new post, in March 2016, as Angola entered into its second year of economic crises after the collapse of the country’s commodity prices. She was presented with the unenviable task of following through on the Government’s political commitments in delivering one million…

January 17, 2017 by Samuel Suttner | No Comments

In our work, in order to understand market dynamics, there’s often a need to acknowledge the difference between formal and informal housing. We tend to have a flexible definition, guided by what definition is suited better to the research project. We know that definitions vary and take account of the way the building was constructed (developer or household), the type of building materials used and whether the house has legal title (the latter of which is important because a title is required for the house to act as collateral for a mortgage). Eighty20, a consultancy, has recorded the different definitions…

January 16, 2017 | No Comments

On 10 January 2017,  the Jozi Today, on Radio Today, interviewed the Executive Director of CAHF, Kecia Rust, on housing markets, CAHF and her career. Listen below to find our more about our work, our theory of change and housing finance in Africa.  

December 14, 2016 by Samuel Suttner | No Comments

  If you follow our work, or are interested in the sector, you will know that data on housing finance across Africa is scarce. You’ll also know that without proper data investors, lenders, government, regulators and other stakeholders cannot make informed decisions that support market growth. This dearth of information is particularly acute when it comes to how urban households in Africa invest in their housing: How long does it take to build a house? What financing tools are used? What challenges are faced and what is prioritised? How is land secured? As part of our efforts to contribute to…

December 8, 2016 | No Comments

Overview Before the revolution of 2011, Tunisia was widely regarded as one of the best performing countries in terms of economic and human development of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. After the instability and associated slowing economic growth, the country rebounded, adopting a new constitution in 2014. However, GDP grew only by 0.8 percent in 2015 against 2.3 percent in 2014, the lowest since the 2011 economic slowdown. The drop in the national savings rate (12.2 percent of GNDI in 2015, against 14.4 percent in 2014), along with the investment rate regression (19.4 percent of GDP in…

November 15, 2016 | No Comments

Overview Kenya has gradually emerged from political instability and an economic slowdown to be one of Africa’s most developed countries and among the fastest growing economies in the world. The World Bank predicts GDP growth to be 5.9 percent in 2016 and 6.1 percent in 2017, from an average 5.46 percent between 2011 and 2015, driven by the agricultural, construction, real estate, and financial and insurance sectors. The Central Bank of Kenya (CBK) has effectively managed currency volatility by running down forex reserves to cushion the Shilling. The current account deficit as a percentage of GDP narrowed, from 14.5 percent…

November 7, 2016 by Kecia Rust | No Comments

This overview essay was published in the Housing Finance in Africa Yearbook 2016. Across Africa, the residential investment opportunity is increasingly driving conversations about economic growth. While the definition of who is middle class and how many such households there are continue, the fact of Africa’s rising population and rapid urbanisation is palpable in its cities where the inadequate housing conditions of the majority are obvious. For every problem, there is an opportunity for a solution, and in increasingly creative ways, this is what Africa’s housing investors are finding.   Take International Housing Solutions, a private equity investor that has mobilised investors…

October 27, 2016 by Daniel Phiri | No Comments

Like many governments in the Global South, Zambia struggles with the provision of affordable housing. The national housing deficit stands at more than 2 million units and is compounded by rapid population growth and continued rural to urban migration. Existing policies and legal corpus have been ineffective in ensuring access to land, housing finance, and security of tenure, building materials, skilled labour, infrastructure and urban services. Zambia’s existing housing stock is estimated at 2.5 million units, of which 64 percent is traditional housing, while 36 percent (or about 800 000 units) is urban housing. About 28.5 percent of the urban…