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May 5, 2016 | No Comments

On 28 April 2016, the African Union for Housing Finance (AUHF) and Financial Sector Deepening (FSDMoç) hosted a seminar on housing finance in Mozambique. The seminar brought together different stakeholders, who discussed recent developments in the sector and debated what needs to be done to create an enabling environment for housing in Mozambique. The AUHF, CAHF, Confederação das Associações Económicas de Moçambique (CTA), FSDMoç, Fundo Para O Fomento de Habitacao (FFH), Moza Banco, Perene Consulting, Reall and UN-Habitat all gave presentations, some of which you can find below. Presentations Addressing the Challenges of Housing Finance in Africa Kecia Rust | Centre for Affordable Housing Finance in Africa (CAHF) Fundo…

April 6, 2016 | No Comments

      The Centre for Affordable Housing Finance in Africa hosted a side event on housing microfinance at the Habitat III Thematic Meeting on Informal Settlements, with the African Union for Housing Finance, Development Workshop Angola, Positive Planet and Select Africa. The presentations from the CAHF event: Housing Microfinance as a Tool for Informal Settlement Upgrading in Africa Kecia Rust | CAHF Housing Microfinance and Informal Land Markets: The Case of Kixi Crédito Angola Allan Cain | Development Workshop Angola A Business Minded Approach to Housing Microfinance Wayne Faulds | Select Africa Housing Microfinance in Ghana: Housing Finance or Entrepreneurial…

March 11, 2016 by Kecia Rust, UN Habitat | No Comments

Our Executive Director, Kecia Rust, gave a the fifth lecture, titled Extending Access to Housing Finance across Africa, for the third season of  UN Habitat‘s Global Urban Lecture Series. SYNOPSIS If cities are built the way they are financed (Renaud, 1984), then Africa’s cities are set to change. Innovation in housing finance – in terms of products, players, and approaches, not to mention target markets – is a key feature across the continent, creating new opportunities for investment and delivery. As both local and international investors chase growth opportunities in a sluggish global economy, they are employing diversification strategies to manage the…

Extract from Issue 49 of the African Union for Housing Finance newsletter: Investors are constantly looking to invest in new markets. Though, variation in regulation and opaque investing instruments can make investors too wary to commit to even the most enticing opportunities, such as with residential real estate across Africa. The introduction of real estate investment trusts (REITs) may change this: a vehicle that investors understand and can trust, aggregating diverse sources of funding from international and institutional investors through to households, and funneling them into a portfolio that extends beyond the limitations of individual projects. There appear to be…

As part of its coverage of the Africities Summit, Al Jazeera explored the lack of affordable housing in South Africa, and interviewed Citymark Director Adelaide Steedley about the key issues constraining the supply of new housing.

Since the end of the civil war in 2002, the government of Angola has used Chinese credit facilities backed by petroleum guarantees for massive infrastructure rehabilitation and to build prestige urban projects. The most famous is the public-privately developed Kilamba “Centralidade” with 20 000 apartments, China’s largest housing venture in Africa. The apartments, at first promoted as social-housing, were initially too expensive for most of the population and the state had to draw funds from its housing budget to subsidise the scheme to make units affordable for upper-middle-level civil servants. Further projects, comprising an estimated 150 000 units, are planned in…

February 7, 2016 | No Comments

Click here to access the published case studies Across Africa, practitioners are grappling with the challenge of creating an enabled housing finance environment. Blockages occur all along the value chain, constraining the efforts of those trying to make housing and housing finance affordable. Yet, there is a growing track record of novel solutions and initiatives, pioneered by policy makers, financiers, developers and households themselves, suggesting that there are new opportunities for making the housing finance sector work for the poor in Africa. By recording these efforts, the Centre for Affordable Housing Finance in Africa seeks to highlight that there is…

Extract from Issue 48 of the African Union for Housing Finance newsletter: As housing backlogs continue to increase exponentially across the continent, the need for investment is becoming increasingly urgent. In this regard, housing—particularly for those who cannot afford to access it without some form of assistance—is slowly moving away from being seen as merely an act of philanthropy, and is beginning to be perceived as a credible investment sector. Yet, housing for the poor continues to be a social good. Jed Emerson, of Blended Value, asks: How do we begin to think about investing as a form of philanthropy…

January 18, 2016 by Kecia Rust | No Comments

This blog is drawn from the Housing Finance in Africa Yearbook 2015. Author: Kecia Rust If cities are built the way they are financed (Renaud, 1984), then Africa’s cities are set to change.  Innovation in housing finance –in terms of products, players, and approaches, not to mention target markets – is a key feature across the continent, creating new opportunities for investment and delivery.  As both local and international investors chase growth opportunities in a sluggish global economy, they are employing diversification strategies to manage the risks of their traditional targets – and in this, residential property is increasingly becoming an option. …

January 14, 2016 by Samuel Suttner | No Comments

The Economist posted an interesting blog comparing the performance of house prices in 25 countries. It includes a house price index, prices in real terms, prices against average income, prices against rents and the percentage change in house prices. Unfortunately, the only African country represented is South Africa; there’s a dearth of data on the continent’s housing markets. Hopefully, with efforts to collect more data, such as those currently underway in Kenya and Uganda, we can see how housing markets are performing in more African countries. Another caveat is that the data used for South Africa are from ABSA Bank’s housing price indices,…